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CBRN training during COVID operations help maintain battle readiness

Close of of man wearing Gas mask.

Senior Airman Connor Link, 375th Logistics Readiness Squadron ground transportation wears Mission Oriented Protective Posture level four gear during training on Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Oct. 13, 2020. The five levels of MOPP gear are effected by the level of threat and mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shannon Moorehead)

Man writes on paper.

Airman 1st Class Marcus Chom, 375th Logistic Readiness Squadron ground transportation documents mask inspection on a DD Form 1574 on Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Oct. 13, 2020. These forms are filled out after preventative maintenance and inspections to ensure the serviceability of equipment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shannon Moorehead)

Airman holds protective gas mask.

Senior Airman Tanastacia Hill, 375th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management technician instructs students how to properly wear a protective mask on Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Oct. 13, 2020. Protective masks ensure service members are able to breathe without complications in the events of a real-world Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear event. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shannon Moorehead)

Airman puts on CBRN equipment

Senior Airman Maria Meadows, 375th Logistic Readiness Squadron ground transportation puts on her mask carrier during Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear training on Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Oct. 13, 2020. CBRN training includes familiarization of CBRN hazards, protective equipment and CBRN attack actions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shannon Moorehead)

Airman adjusts hood of MOPP gear.

Senior Airman William Murray, 375th Communications Squadron security manager adjusts the hood of his Mission Oriented Protective Posture training gear on Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Oct. 13, 2020. To complete Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear training participants must correctly dress to MOPP level 4; the highest CBRN readiness posture. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shannon Moorehead)

Airman adjusts his MOPP gear.

Senior Airman William Murray, 375th Communications Squadron security manager puts on gloves during Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear training on Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Oct. 13, 2020. Since COVID-19 CBRN classes have adapted safety measures to ensure safety during training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shannon Moorehead)

Airman instructs student in MOPP gear.

Senior Airman Tanastacia Hill, 375th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management technician instructs a Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear class on Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Oct. 13, 2020. CBRN training teaches basic threat knowledge and proper emergency preparedness skills in the event of real-world situations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shannon Moorehead)

Pile of MOPP gear on the floor.

Mission Oriented Protective Posture training gear on Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Oct. 13, 2020. MOPP gear is utilized for personal protection against nuclear, biological, chemical, and conventional threats. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Shannon Moorehead)

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. – Chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear attacks are some of the most hostile environments service members may be exposed to in a combat zone, and which is why training must continue despite COVID pandemic restrictions.

Known as CBRN for short, this training teaches basic threat knowledge and proper emergency preparedness skills in the event of a real-world situation.

CBRN instructors such as Staff Sgt. Collin Hinnant, 375th Civil Engineer Squadron emergency management operations section lead, trains service members so that they are properly equipped with the knowledge to survive.

“This training helps maintain battle readiness by ensuring that our members are familiar and comfortable with the protective equipment so that they can safely operate in a CBRN environment,” he said.

The training covers three areas which are: CBRN hazards, protective equipment and CBRN attack actions. These instructor-led courses provide individual and team performance-based objectives that posture military members so that they can continue the mission while preventing exposures to the various agents.

For additional safety through the pandemic, the 375th CES decreased class sizes, and students are required to have their temperature taken before the course as well as maintain a physical distance of eight feet.

Initially the 375th CES stopped all classes in March, however after adapting innovative measures to ensure the safety of students, they were able to resume their mission in April with smaller sizes.

Patrick Hanlon, 375th CES emergency management training section lead, said that with fewer students going through the course, they have increased course frequency so they can maintain readiness and that they are on track to meet training goals.