An official website of the United States government
Here's how you know
A .mil website belongs to an official U.S. Department of Defense organization in the United States.
A lock (lock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .mil website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Keys to a successful CI

  • Published
  • By Col. Michael Hornitschek
  • 375th Air Mobility Wing Commander
We recently passed the 120 day mark for our August Compliance Inspection. We are well on our way to the home stretch, and must continue to build upon the foundations we have laid within our respective work centers to ensure we live up to our logo...Outshine, Outserve and Outperform!

The most important thing to understand about a CI upfront is that a compliance inspection is an open book test with the ultimate goal to ensure we are following the policies, procedures, and standards outlined in Air Force instructions as well as other regulatory guidance. Each and every day, in everything we do, we must be certain to stay within the confines of these instructions--they ensure the safety of our personnel and equipment, that our processes are legally sound, as well as protect our resources from fraud, waste and abuse.

Our bi-annual self-inspection program helps validate our currency with our governing policies and procedures by having us review documentation, past records, and other products. In the past six months we have spent a lot of time and effort running our checklists, and have identified areas where we need to polish and focus to be fully successful in everything we do.

This is a great start. There is another area that we need to consider in our CI preparation and that is interacting with the IG team. I want to highlight some are keys to success that I feel are really important.

Communication
Communicating with inspectors can be an anxiety-provoking event but it doesn't have to be. As with every skill, practice makes perfect. Leadership must ensure that the appropriate unit programs are in place and unit members know their job well. Prepare through role playing; supervisors can assist their staff by having personnel explain in detail or demonstrate procedures, especially the ones they do on a daily basis. In addition, members need to know where to find reference material if they can't answer a question. It is better to get back to the inspector with an answer than to make one up!

Presentation
You only get one chance to make a first impression, so make it good. Make sure your work centers are presentable, ensure proper dress and appearance is above reproach, render proper customs and courtesies and use rank and last name when referring to one another.

Attitude
Be responsive and show enthusiasm about your job and work center. A sense of urgency and positive attitude go a long way to demonstrate our commitment to the mission.

Safety First
Safety first should always be the top priority in all that we do. Remember to wear your seatbelts, and stop for pedestrians in all crosswalks. Wear your reflective belts during times of low light or visibility. Use the right tools for the job, and take extra precautions during adverse weather. Always use hands-free cell phone devices while driving.

In closing, this is your opportunity to not only highlight your hard work, but to also demonstrate why the 375th Air Mobility Wing is called AMC's Showcase Wing. Success during any inspection is rooted in dedicated preparation and conscious attention to detail. I am convinced, based on your preparation you've already put forth, the proper attitude and the motivation to succeed, that we will be successful. Remember the words of Gen. George S. Patton, "Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory." Let's stay focused and remain positive; we will soon have the opportunity to see the fruits of our labor. 3-7-5...Showcase Pride!