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Barrier Activated: Security Forces stop gate runners

U.S. Air Force Airman First Class Thaniel Nipper, 375th Security Forces Squadron installation entry controller, keeps the installation safe and secure at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, September 10, 2021. Nipper recently stopped a driver who did not provide authorized credentials from entering Scott AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Stephanie Henry)

U.S. Air Force Airman First Class Thaniel Nipper, 375th Security Forces Squadron installation entry controller, keeps the installation safe and secure at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, September 10, 2021. Nipper recently stopped a driver who did not provide authorized credentials from entering Scott AFB. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Stephanie Henry)

Scott Air Force Base, Ill. -- The 375th Security Forces Squadron has great pride in providing security and safety to Team Scott personnel, members and residents. Recently, there were two different incidents where individuals drove past the gate guard without rendering proper identification.

The purpose of the gate guard is to positively identify and validate authorized credentials for individuals entering the base to ensure unauthorized individuals do not gain access. If they were not at the gate, anyone, without verification, would be able to gain access causing security risks.

According to Airman 1st Class Thaniel Nipper, 375th SFS installation entry controller, the first gate runner came up to the gate without his window down and drove by him without showing proper identification. Unable to get the driver's attention, Nipper quickly called it in and activated the active vehicle net barrier to stop the gate runner from gaining access to the base.

The other incident was a non-base affiliated civilian who drove through the gate while intoxicated and did not render proper identification. Airman First Class Jonathan Morales-Velez, 375th SFS installation entry controller, stopped this incident from becoming a security risk.

From how Airmen are trained, they have the muscle reflex capabilities that are needed to make split second decisions.

“All defenders complete the Security Forces Academy prior to going to their first duty station,” said Senior Master Sgt. Timothy Ogan, 375th SFS operations superintendent. “In addition, all Defenders must complete a rigorous and robust training curriculum and Duty Position Evaluation certification prior to posting as an Installation Entry Controller.”

The 375th SFS are proud of their Airmen and how they responded. 

“Great job on your vigilance and quick decision-making abilities,” said Ogan.

Dealing with instances such as this and others, it is no coincidence that Security Forces have “Defensor Fortis,” which means “Defenders of the Force” as their motto.

“To me, our motto means to always stay vigilant,” said Nipper. “Always making sure you know what your job is and making sure you can rely on the individual standing next to you.”