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906th ARS takes teamwork to a new level

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Doniel Dortch, 906th Aerial Refueling Squadron metals technology fabrication welder, welds a piece of metal together for an engine trainer on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The metal piece was a small piece that would be put onto an engine specially made for simulating real engines for training purposes.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mark Sulaica)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Angel Jimenez-Ramirez, 906th Air Refueling Squadron KC-135 Stratotanker aerospace maintenance journeyman, and U.S. Air National Guard Mike Landoll, 126th ARS KC-135 aerospace maintenance journeyman, secure aircraft on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, June 2, 2021. The Airmen secured the KC-135 using proper safety procedures to perform routine maintenance to the aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mark Sulaica)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Doniel Dortch, 906th Aerial Refueling Squadron metals technology fabrication welder, welds a piece of metal together for an engine trainer on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The metal piece was a small piece that would be put onto an engine specially made for simulating real engines for training purposes.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mark Sulaica)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Doniel Dortch, 906th Aerial Refueling Squadron metals technology fabrication welder, welds a piece of metal together for an engine trainer on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The metal piece was a small piece that would be put onto an engine specially made for simulating real engines for training purposes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mark Sulaica)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Doniel Dortch, 906th Aerial Refueling Squadron metals technology fabrication welder, welds a piece of metal together for an engine trainer on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The metal piece was a small piece that would be put onto an engine specially made for simulating real engines for training purposes.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mark Sulaica)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Doniel Dortch, 906th Aerial Refueling Squadron metals technology fabrication welder, puts on appropriate Personal Protection Equipment before welding for an engine trainer on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois. The PPE provides important protection to a welder from hot metal and debris. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mark Sulaica)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Sabian Scott, 906th Air Refueling Squadron KC-135 Stratotanker aerospace maintenance journeyman, and U.S. Air National Guard Airman 1st Class Brian Okoniewski 126th ARS  KC-135 aerospace maintenance journeyman, inspect the refueling panel inside of a KC-135 on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, June 2, 2021. The refueling panel allows them to inform the Airmen outside of the aircraft when the aircraft is refueled. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mark Sulaica

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Sabian Scott, 906th Air Refueling Squadron KC-135 Stratotanker aerospace maintenance journeyman, and U.S. Air National Guard Airman 1st Class Brian Okoniewski 126th ARS KC-135 aerospace maintenance journeyman, inspect the refueling panel inside of a KC-135 on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, June 2, 2021. The refueling panel allows them to inform the Airmen outside of the aircraft when the aircraft is refueled. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mark Sulaica

U.S. Air National Guard Airman 1st Class Paul Kampwerth, 126th Air Refueling Squadron hydraulics apprentice, equips an engine cover on a KC-135 Stratotanker on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, June 2, 2021. Kampwerth was putting on the engine cover to prevent debris from interfering with the aircraft engines while routine maintenance was performed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mark Sulaica)

U.S. Air National Guard Airman 1st Class Paul Kampwerth, 126th Air Refueling Squadron hydraulics apprentice, equips an engine cover on a KC-135 Stratotanker on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, June 2, 2021. Kampwerth was putting on the engine cover to prevent debris from interfering with the aircraft engines while routine maintenance was performed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Mark Sulaica)

Scott Air Force Base, Ill. – Airmen across 32 different career fields work in unison to service, sustain and fly KC-135 Stratotankers. These Airmen, with the 906th Air Refueling Squadron on Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, enable a global support mission in tandem with Air National Guardsmen.

A unique trait of this Squadron that not many share is their interoperability with multiple aspects of the total force package. These active duty Airmen get the job done every day alongside their brothers-in-arms, and critical Team Scott members, with the 126th ARS Air National Guard Airmen. These Airmen help provide global support in air refueling for our mobility Airmen across the globe.

“A lot of bases you go to across my career are separated, you’re in your little section; you’re not really sure how you fit in the grand scheme of things,” said Master Sgt. Ronald Fisher, 906th ARS maintenance superintendent. “Having all these shops being able to coordinate work together especially in close proximity, allows all of our members to see exactly what they’re doing and how this shop affects the mission overall so it really is a huge deal.”

With the assistance of the 126th ARS integrated into the 906th ARS, Airmen are capable of solving issues quicker.

“They have the experience on the Aircraft,” said Fisher. “New problems that arise a lot of times are not new problems to them,” he explained. “Having the ANG wealth of experience maintaining the aircraft speeds up the process for training new Airman, young staff and tech sergeants, allowing the 906th ARS to defeat tasks with the support of the ANG.”

Fisher explained that the bonds between the 906th ARS and ANG runs deep. To Fisher it is hard to differentiate between active duty and guard.

The interoperability produces better quality Airmen. The integration between the two units is paramount in its mission's success, said Fisher. 

“The numbers show we are definitely killing it,” said Fisher. “I’m so proud of my Airmen for what they do everyday.”