HomeNewsArticle Display

Showcase Wing completes week-long exercise to stay ‘battle ready’

U.S. Air Force firefighter respond during exercise

Firefighters from the 375th Civil Engineer Squadron arrive on scene during a simulated mass casualty scenario during Crisis Look 20-07 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept. 24, 2020. Once on scene the first responders tended to the needs of casualties and simulated their transport to medical evacuation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

U.S. Air Force officer uses computer

Capt. Gregory Birdsong, 375th Operations Support Squadron airfield operations flight commander, looks at information displayed on his monitor during Crisis Look 20-07 in the Emergency Operations Center at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept. 24, 2020. The EOC serves as a hub where various individuals from organizations that are “key players” in crisis management help implement response during heightened operational incidents. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

U.S. Air Force photojournalist speaks with officer

Senior Airman Miranda Simpson, 375th Air Mobility Wing photojournalist, takes down information from a member of the 375th AMW Air Force Office of Special Investigations office while responding ot a simulated mass casualty event during Crisis Look 20-07 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept 24, 2020. Within her primary duties, Simpson is charged with providing “alert photography” where she works hand-in-hand with security forces and medical members to document crime scenes. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

Air Force officer reports to HQ

Lt. Col. Francisco Flores, 375th Air Mobility Wing director of staff, reports back to the Crisis Action Team during a simulated mass casualty event while participating in Crisis Look 20-07 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept. 24, 2020. Crisis Look is a brand of exercise that is designed to test the limits of Airmen and their organizations’ readiness across various competencies from active shooter to weather damage response measures. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

U.S. Air Force officer administers Self-Aid and Buddy Care

Col. Angela Ochoa, 375th Air Mobility Wing vice commander, provides Self-Aid and Buddy Care to an Airman after a simulated explosion that left them with an abdominal injury at the Parade Field at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept 24, 2020. Scenarios such as mass casualty and active shooter incidents were designed to make Crisis Look 20-07 as realistic as possible to test the limits of Team Scott’s response. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

U.S. Air Force Airmen carry another Airman

Members from the 375th Air Mobility Wing provide Self-Aid and Buddy Care to other Airmen during Crisis Look 20-07. Crisis Look is a brand of exercise that is designed to put Airmen through realistic and stressful scenarios to test their readiness to respond to events such as active shooters and mass casualty incidents. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

U.S. Air Force Airmen administer Self-Aid and Buddy Care

Members of the 375th Air Mobility Wing participate in a mass casualty simulation during Crisis Look 20-07 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept 24, 2020. The week-long exercise was designed to evaluate response procedures and Airmen’s competencies during stressful events in a safe and controlled environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

375th AMW members administer SABC

Members of the 375th Air Mobility Wing respond to a simulated casualty at the Parade Field at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept. 24, 2020. While participating in the exercise Crisis Look 20-07, Airmen from across the 375th AMW had their readiness tested in scenarios such as mass casualty, active shooter, severe weather events and others. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

U.S. Air Force Airmen administer SABC

A member of the 375th Air Mobility Wing wing inspection team, right, briefs Lt. Col. Ryan Petersen, 375th AMW chief of safety, right, on the part he will play as an injured victim of a simulated attack during Crisis Look 20-07 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept. 24, 2020. While conducting a mass casualty scenario members of wing inspection team designated individuals at random to be the recipient of faux injuries so others could be evaluated on Self-Aid and Buddy Care. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

U.S. Air Force officer briefs team
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 12

Col. Angela Ochoa, 375th Air Mobility Wing vice commander, right, speaks to members of the 375th AMW while they gather after simulating evacuation of the 375th AMW Headquarters building due to a bomb threat at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept. 2020. Shortly after this photo was taken, an inject of a mass casualty incident sprung Airmen into action to provide Self-Aid and Buddy Care as well as provide security of those present. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

U.S. Air Force Airmen use heavy equipment
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 12

Senior Airman Aaron Mason, 375th Civil Engineer Squadron pavement and equipment journeyman, marshals a forklift carrying a concrete barrier on Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept. 24, 2020. Concrete barriers were placed around the installation in support of Crisis Look 20-07, an exercise that simulated active shooter and mass casualty scenarios to test the readiness of the installation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

Heavy equipment moves concrete barrier
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 12 of 12

Senior Airman Blake Brophy, 375th Civil Engineer Squadron pavement and equipment journeyman, moves a concrete barrier into place during an exercise at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., Sept 23, 2020. The exercise named Crisis Look 20-07 was a week-long event that put the Airmen of Scott AFB through various scenarios to test their readiness to respond to events such as mass casualty and active shooter occurrences. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Solomon Cook)

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. -- The 375th Air Mobility Wing recently conducted a week-long exercise that tested its ability to respond and communicate through several scenarios designed to keep personnel “battle ready.”

Crisis Look, a brand of exercise, focused on analyzing threats, responding to an active shooter and a mass-casualty event, and performing checklists of weather-related and force protection scenarios.  

 “The purpose of the exercise was to test our mission assurance and response capabilities, and ensuring that we did so in accordance with several operating plans that the [375th AMW] has,” said Charley Mills, 375th  Inspector General director.

Mills explained “how we could have an active shooter on this base any day, any time or we could have a tornado barreling down at the base any day, any time” so It’s important to know how to respond to those types of incidents.

During the mass-casualty portion of the exercise, Airmen were “moulaged,” which is the art of applying mock injuries for the purpose of training emergency response teams and other medical and military personnel to give a realistic feel to the exercise. Personnel were then evaluated on how well they performed Self Aid Buddy Care.

“The individuals who were performing [SABC] were spot on in what they were doing. If you can't take care of yourself, you can't take care of others in a situation like that—then somebody's going to die,” Mills said starkly.

Members of the IG team observed the capability of the installation to respond with the help of Wing Inspection Team, or WIT, members, such as Tech. Sgt. Alisha Curtis, 375th AMW Command Post command and control NCO in charge.

She explained how a WIT member’s role is to supplement the function of IG, as the number of units and sections to be evaluated during an exercise outnumber the available IG personnel. Additionally, WIT members are subject matter experts for the function they represent and are better equipped to effectively evaluate their member’s performance.

“WIT members play a vital role in ensuring real-world readiness, because through evaluations we can identify and create corrective actions for each section to improve our response to real-world situations,” she said. “This was perfectly displayed during this past exercise, when a real world incident took place. Without hesitation, our Security Forces, Command Post, Threat Working Group and the Crisis Action Team used recent WIT feedbacks and applied it to the a real-world situation, thus displaying unit readiness.”

For others, being a ready, lethal force means having good “muscle memory,” as Senior Airman Noah Calvert, a 375th Security Forces Squadron trainer explained.

“[With this exercise, one could say] everything was thrown out here besides the kitchen sink. That's very good because of how realistic it is to have all those things happen at once. So, if you're in stress-induced environment and you become used to operating in it, once [an event] happens—your body is ready [to respond].”

As scenarios for training were injected throughout the exercise, the Emergency Operations Center with the assistance of the Crisis Action Team and Threat Working Group, answered the call and got instructions and battle rhythms to units across base.

Col. Jason Glynn, 375th Mission Support Group commander and EOC director, said that “the EOC is a mechanism for responding to incidents that occur on the installation. We support the incident commander and report to the Crisis Action Team. The EOC is focused on the actual incident and bringing all the capabilities of units on the installation to bear to support the incident commander.”

He said one of the biggest challenges throughout a week like this is communication, which can be taxing.

“Dealing with incomplete information, and the demands and the pressure of time are very real challenges that would occur in exercises and would occur if an actual situation were to happen.  So the way you overcome that is you find ways to communicate. You try to over-communicate as much as you can,” he explained. “At the same time, [you try to] protect the first responders from communication saturation or communication overwhelm.”

He said that from his vantage point, units performed well, “but like any good team, there are a lot of opportunities for us to improve. So that's probably the most important thing that we do, is after the exercise is done is to sit down and do some self-reflection and evaluate how we performed and where those opportunities are to get better.”

For the IG, Mills said, “[The exercise went] very well. People responded and reacted appropriately. There were a few hiccups here and there, but for the most part, I'd say it went rather well.”