HomeNewsArticle Display

Wildfires across California propel ash, smoke above Travis AFB

A U.S. Air Force C-5M Super Galaxy prepares to land on the runway Sept. 9, 2020, at Travis Air Force Base, California. Wildfires across California propelled smoke and ash into the troposphere, impacting air quality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

A U.S. Air Force C-5M Super Galaxy prepares to land on the runway Sept. 9, 2020, at Travis Air Force Base, California. Wildfires across California propelled smoke and ash into the troposphere, impacting air quality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jasper Walker, 860th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron integrated flight system control journeyman, looks over paperwork while inside a C-17 Globemaster III Sept. 9, 2020 at Travis Air Force Base, California. Wildfires across California propelled smoke and ash into the troposphere, impacting air quality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jasper Walker, 860th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron integrated flight system control journeyman, looks over paperwork while inside a C-17 Globemaster III Sept. 9, 2020 at Travis Air Force Base, California. Wildfires across California propelled smoke and ash into the troposphere, impacting air quality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Airmen are lifted in a large condor lift above a C-5M tail with a smokey, yellowish sky.

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 60th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron perform routine maintenance on a C-5M Super Galaxy tail at Travis Air Force Base, California, Sept. 9, 2020. Wildfires across California propelled ash and smoke into the troposphere, the lowest region of the atmosphere, impacting the air quality and sky color. (U.S. Air Force photo by Chustine Minoda)

Two airmen stand on a large lift condor with a yellowish, smokey sky.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Victoria Lovell, 60th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron aerospace propulsion journeyman, left, and Airman 1st Class Ivan Rodriguez, 60th AMXS aerospace hydraulics journeyman, stand on a condor high reach lift at Travis Air Force Base, California, Sept. 9, 2020. Wildfires across California propelled ash and smoke into the troposphere, the lowest region of the atmosphere, impacting the air quality and sky color. (U.S. Air Force photo by Chustine Minoda)

A C-5M takes off on the flight line with a yellowish, smokey sky.

A C-5M Super Galaxy takes off from the flight line at Travis Air Force Base, California, Sept. 9, 2020. Wildfires across California propelled ash and smoke into the troposphere, the lowest region of the atmosphere, impacting the air quality and sky color. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Amelia Chromy)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Ricardo Puente, 60th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, services the oxygen system of a C-5M Super Galaxy Sept. 9, 2020 at Travis Air Force Base, California. Wildfires across California propelled smoke and ash into the troposphere, impacting air quality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Ricardo Puente, 60th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron crew chief, services the oxygen system of a C-5M Super Galaxy Sept. 9, 2020 at Travis Air Force Base, California. Wildfires across California propelled smoke and ash into the troposphere, impacting air quality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Airmen on the flight line with a smokey, yellowish sky.

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 60th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron rest on a large-scale fire extinguisher at Travis Air Force Base, California, Sept. 9, 2020. Wildfires across California propelled ash and smoke into the troposphere, the lowest region of the atmosphere, impacting the air quality and sky color. (U.S. Air Force photo by Nicholas Pilch)

Airmen work on a wing of a C-17 while another C-17 takes off in the background.

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 860th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron conduct routine maintenance to the wing of a C-17 Globemaster III at Travis Air Force Base, California, Sept. 9, 2020. Wildfires across California propelled ash and smoke into the troposphere, the lowest region of the atmosphere, impacting the air quality and sky color. (U.S. Air Force photo by Nicholas Pilch)

A KC-10 Extender takes off at Travis Air Force Base, California, Sept. 9, 2020. Wildfires across California propelled smoke and ash into the troposphere, impacting air quality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

A KC-10 Extender takes off at Travis Air Force Base, California, Sept. 9, 2020. Wildfires across California propelled smoke and ash into the troposphere, impacting air quality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Airmen attach a towing vehicle to a C-5M on the flight line with a yellowish, smokey sky.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 11

U.S. Airmen assigned to the 60th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron prepare to tow a C-5M Super Galaxy at Travis Air Force Base, California, Sept. 9, 2020. Wildfires across California propelled ash and smoke into the troposphere, the lowest region of the atmosphere, impacting the air quality and sky color. (U.S. Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Amelia Chromy)

A C-5M Super Galaxy takes off at Travis Air Force Base, California, Sept. 9, 2020. Wildfires across California propelled smoke and ash into the troposphere, impacting air quality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 11

A C-5M Super Galaxy takes off at Travis Air Force Base, California, Sept. 9, 2020. Wildfires across California propelled smoke and ash into the troposphere, impacting air quality. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heide Couch)

Travis Air Force Base, California --