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375th Operations Group

A C-21 assigned to 458 Airlift Squadron,Scott Air Force Base, Ill.(Images by 3rd Combat Camera Squadron)

A C-21 assigned to 458 Airlift Squadron,Scott Air Force Base, Ill.(Images by 3rd Combat Camera Squadron)

Staff Sgt. Jimmie Williamson, 54th Airlift Squadron flight attendant,  serves a purchased meal to 32 commanders from Scott Air Force Base, Ill on a C-40 aircraft Nov. 29 The meal was a training event for the four flight attendants who usually serve in-between 12 to 20 guests at the most.  This was a static aircraft on the ground and each individual paid for their meals with no cost to the government. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade)

Staff Sgt. Jimmie Williamson, 54th Airlift Squadron flight attendant, serves a purchased meal to 32 commanders from Scott Air Force Base, Ill on a C-40 aircraft Nov. 29 The meal was a training event for the four flight attendants who usually serve in-between 12 to 20 guests at the most. This was a static aircraft on the ground and each individual paid for their meals with no cost to the government. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade)

A KC-135R Stratotanker from the 126th Air Refueling Wing takes off Aug. 3 at Scott. The stratotanker is capable of providing aerial refueling and airlift support to all branches of the military to enhance the mission.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade)

A KC-135R Stratotanker from the 126th Air Refueling Wing takes off Aug. 3 at Scott. The stratotanker is capable of providing aerial refueling and airlift support to all branches of the military to enhance the mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade)

Senior Airman Kaleb Joyner, 375th Operations Support Squadron, trains on the tower simulator system Aug. 3 at Scott.  The simulator system is used to train air traffic controllers and keep them proficient by using real scenarios they may face daily. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade)

Senior Airman Kaleb Joyner, 375th Operations Support Squadron, trains on the tower simulator system Aug. 3 at Scott. The simulator system is used to train air traffic controllers and keep them proficient by using real scenarios they may face daily. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade)

Lt. Col. Tony Caparella, 458th Airlift Squadron, and Maj. Steve Bolster, Air Mobility Command, use a map to coordinate their flight plan for the day Aug. 3 at Scott. The 458th Airlift Squadron operates 19 C-21A aircraft out of three geographically separated locations including Scott. They provide first-class Operational Airlift and Aeromedical Evacuation support both at home and while. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade)

Lt. Col. Tony Caparella, 458th Airlift Squadron, and Maj. Steve Bolster, Air Mobility Command, use a map to coordinate their flight plan for the day Aug. 3 at Scott. The 458th Airlift Squadron operates 19 C-21A aircraft out of three geographically separated locations including Scott. They provide first-class Operational Airlift and Aeromedical Evacuation support both at home and while. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade)

Staff Sgt.  John Southwell (left) and Douglas Sanchez secure a litter carrying a simulated burn patient during training on a KC-135 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., before a training mission with the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research from San Antonio Military Medical Center, Texas Aug. 28, 2012. The SMMC has the only DoD Burn Transport Team consisting of 6 members who fly worldwide to stabilize and transport some of the worst burn cases. The burn unit depends on AE crews to prepare the aircraft and equipment, interface their Intensive Care Units, assist with patient care in the airborne environment, and safely manages the overall mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade)

Staff Sgt. John Southwell (left) and Douglas Sanchez secure a litter carrying a simulated burn patient during training on a KC-135 at Scott Air Force Base, Ill., before a training mission with the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research from San Antonio Military Medical Center, Texas Aug. 28, 2012. The SMMC has the only DoD Burn Transport Team consisting of 6 members who fly worldwide to stabilize and transport some of the worst burn cases. The burn unit depends on AE crews to prepare the aircraft and equipment, interface their Intensive Care Units, assist with patient care in the airborne environment, and safely manages the overall mission. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Stephenie Wade)

The 375th Operations Group is a diverse group of 524 military, civilian, and contract personnel in seven squadrons and one Detachment located at four different locations within the U.S. The primary missions of the group is to provide aeromedical evacuation, executive air transportation, flight inspection, evaluation of new aviation technologies, and air refueling of critical DoD assets. Medical personnel in the group provide rapid aeromedical evacuation support for stateside and/or worldwide contingencies on four different mobility aircraft. The group's Total Force Integration squadrons conduct Operational Support Airlift with three AFRC-owned C-40C aircraft and air refueling with eight ANG-owned KC-135R aircraft. The group also provides operational support airlift to priority passengers from three in-garrison and one deployed locations with its 16 C-21A aircraft. In coordination with the DoD, FAA, and ICAO, the group develops procedures to integrate emerging technologies into U.S. Air Force flight operations with its two uniquely-equipped NC-21 aircraft. It is also responsible for the delivery of worldwide combatant commander contingency flight inspection jointly with the FAA. Finally, the group has responsibility for all airfield operations and management, including air traffic control of the shared-use Scott AFB/Mid America Airport called home by three flying wings.

The 375th Aeromedical Evacuation Squadron provides rapid response aeromedical evacuation capability for any contingency. The unit trains, mobilizes, and deploys nearly 150 members to support a Theater Aeromedical Evacuation System conducting aeromedical evacuation missions aboard C-21A, C-17A, C-130E/H/J, and KC-135R aircraft. The 375th AES provides command and control over the 775th Expeditionary Aeromedical Evacuation Flight executing CONUS patient redistribution of our nation's wounded warriors. The 775th EAEF is comprised of a command element, AE crews, and crew support here at Scott as well as AE crews and crew support at 2 other operating locations at Joint Base Andrews, MD. and Travis AFB, CA.

The 54th Airlift Squadron partners with the 932d Airlift Wing as one of the first-ever AMC/AFRC active associate squadrons under the Total Force Integration model. The squadron flies three specially configured C-40C aircraft on Special Air Missions as directed by HQ USAF to transport members of the Presidential Cabinet and Congress, foreign heads of state, and other dignitaries executing global missions vital to US national security.

The 311th, 457th, and 458th Airlift Squadrons collectively operate 16 C-21A aircraft out of three geographically separated locations including Scott AFB, IL, Joint Base Andrews, MD, and Peterson AFB, CO. They provide first-class Operational Support Airlift and Aeromedical Evacuation with time, place and/or mission-sensitive requirements both at home and while deployed in steadfast support of our Expeditionary Air Force.

The 375th Operations Group, Detachment 1 located at Mike Monroney Aeronautical Center Oklahoma City, Oklahoma operates 2 uniquely-equipped NC-21A Learjets alongside the FAA's fleet of Challenger 600-series aircraft. Det 1's NC-21 mission supports USAF capability of unrestricted, worldwide deployment and employment through test and evaluation of emerging navigation, communication, surveillance, cockpit display and landing systems. Its Combat Flight Inspection mission supports the core competency of global reach and power through contingency flight inspection of airfield navigation and instrument landing systems, radars, and instrument procedures.

The 906th Air Refueling Squadron is an Active Association in partnership with the Illinois National Guard's 126th Air Refueling Wing. The unit leads fully integrated maintenance, planning, and flying operations to execute worldwide air refueling missions on eight KC-135R aircraft.

The 375th Operations Support Squadron is the wing's executive agent for airfield operations. They are globally engaged providing world-class weather services, air traffic control, and shared use airfield management, transient aircraft support, survival and aerospace ground equipment maintenance, life support, aircrew and aeromedical aircrew training and scheduling, and flight records management to meet national objectives.